Keeping pets warm in the winter

Dog in a sweater
Even this might not be enough.

With temperatures plunging below zero, we have been getting a lot of questions from clients wondering if it is safe to bring their dog or cat outdoors. Just as school delays and closings are broadcast to protect children from inclement weather, you should be concerned for the outdoor safety of your pets.

While most dogs and cats come equipped with fur coats, their coat does not ensure they have sufficient protection from the winter cold when temperatures dip below freezing. In general, cats should be kept indoors when temperatures are near freezing to protect them from hypothermia and frostbite. Since dogs differ in their cold tolerance, there is no strict temperature cutoff for when it is no longer safe for dogs to be outside. Puppies and elderly dogs are less able to effectively regulate their body temperature than adult dogs, and this should be taken into consideration when deciding how long they can safely stay outdoors in both cold and warm weather. Dogs with some health conditions such as hypothyroid disease, anemia and laryngeal paralysis, which is also exacerbated by warm weather, may be less tolerant of cold weather. Even a dog’s conformation or body type can play a role. Dogs with short legs that are lower to the ground may be more susceptible to the cold if their abdomens get cold and wet from the snow.

One very important factor in determining how safe it is for your dog to be outside is the presence of wet weather (snow, sleet, rain). Dogs’ fur provides warmth, but when the fur is wet or matted it does not provide as effective insulation. Furthermore, if a dog’s fur gets soaked, the moisture can actually draw heat away from its body, making it even colder. Keeping a dog’s fur well-groomed and dry can increase its cold tolerance.

Wind chill also plays a role. On very cold and windy days, wind draws heat more quickly from the outer surfaces of a dog’s body, decreasing the amount of time it can safely be outdoors.

A waterproof coat can provide an added layer of insulation, a wind barrier and can repel moisture.  Although it may seem silly to dress a dog in a coat, a waterproof coat with good coverage — from a dog’s neck to the base of its tail, and covering its abdomen — can greatly impact the temperatures a dog can safely tolerate. Dogs also lose heat through their footpads. Winter booties, if accepted by your dog, can provide additional warmth as well as protection from ice chunks and de-icing chemicals that can cause irritation to dogs’ paws and can be toxic if ingested.

When pets are exposed to cold weather for too long, they can suffer from hypothermia or frostbite, which can be life threatening. It is important to use common sense. If your dog starts to shiver, seems anxious or uncomfortable outside, or if their extremities seem cold, bring your dog indoors and get them warm and dry as soon as possible.

A side note: Since cats are less tolerant of near freezing temperatures, it is safest for them to be strictly indoors during the colder parts of winter. Outdoor cats may seek warmth and shelter from the cold by settling under the hoods of cars or in wheel wells, which can be deadly. If your vehicle is accessible to cats, before starting your car, bang on the car hood or honk the horn to startle any cats or wildlife to give them a chance to escape without injury.

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  • cpepin

    It’s very disappointing (even irresponsible) that the vet does not encourage people to keep their cats indoors! It’s better for the cats (healthier and safer) and allows neighbors to enjoy wildlife in their yards (chipmunks and birds) without the nuisance of a cat that either kills or scares away this wildlife.

    Songbird populations are declining due to many challenges, including habitat loss, pesticides, and climate change. Experts agree that “Predation by domestic cats is the number-one direct, human-caused threat to birds in the United States…” https://abcbirds.org/program/cats-indoors/cats-and-birds/

    Especially during spring and fall migration, hundreds of thousands of migrants travel thousands of miles and should not have to survive the needless threat of predation by domesticated animals who can be healthy, happy, and safe in their owners’ homes.

    “It’s not about keeping your cat happy; it’s about keeping the native wildlife healthy.” Video at: https://www.facebook.com/AmericanBirdConserve/videos/10156112784721810/

    From the Animal Humane Society: “A cat’s prey drive is so strong that even well-fed cats may naturally enjoy hunting birds or other small animals. Although the impact made by one cat might not seem like a big deal, it is important to think about the total impact of all the cats who are allowed outside. Loose cats are estimated to kill hundreds of millions of birds each year, yet birds are believed to be only 20 percent of the wildlife stray cats kill. Birds are especially at risk around homes with feeders and birdbaths.”

    IF YOU DECIDE TO LET YOUR CAT OUTSIDE:
    – Protect your kitty from other cats. Keep her on a leash or secured in a cage or other confined space where she can’t get out (and other cats can’t get in).
    – Make sure an adult supervises your kitty’s outdoor time to ensure strays cannot come into contact with her.
    – Take her to the veterinarian at least once every year for lifesaving vaccines, as well as parasite screening and treatment.

    http://www.americanhumane.org/fact-sheet/indoor-cats-vs-outdoor-cats/

  • cpepin

    It’s very disappointing (even irresponsible) that the vet does not encourage people to keep their cats indoors! It’s better for the cats (healthier and safer) and allows neighbors to enjoy wildlife in their yards (chipmunks and birds) without the nuisance of a cat that either kills or scares away this wildlife.

    Songbird populations are declining due to many challenges, including habitat loss, pesticides, and climate change. Experts agree that “Predation by domestic cats is the number-one direct, human-caused threat to birds in the United States…” https://abcbirds.org/program/cats-indoors/cats-and-birds/

    Especially during spring and fall migration, hundreds of thousands of migrants travel thousands of miles and should not have to survive the needless threat of predation by domesticated animals who can be healthy, happy, and safe in their owners’ homes.

    “It’s not about keeping your cat happy; it’s about keeping the native wildlife healthy.” Video at: https://www.facebook.com/AmericanBirdConserve/videos/10156112784721810/

    From the Animal Humane Society: “A cat’s prey drive is so strong that even well-fed cats may naturally enjoy hunting birds or other small animals. Although the impact made by one cat might not seem like a big deal, it is important to think about the total impact of all the cats who are allowed outside. Loose cats are estimated to kill hundreds of millions of birds each year, yet birds are believed to be only 20 percent of the wildlife stray cats kill. Birds are especially at risk around homes with feeders and birdbaths.”

    IF YOU DECIDE TO LET YOUR CAT OUTSIDE:
    – Protect your kitty from other cats. Keep her on a leash or secured in a cage or other confined space where she can’t get out (and other cats can’t get in).
    – Make sure an adult supervises your kitty’s outdoor time to ensure strays cannot come into contact with her.
    – Take her to the veterinarian at least once every year for lifesaving vaccines, as well as parasite screening and treatment.

    http://www.americanhumane.org/fact-sheet/indoor-cats-vs-outdoor-cats/

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