Minneapolis school district to hold community budget discussions


Minneapolis Public Schools will hold a series of community discussions this month around plans to address a projected $33 million deficit for 2018-19.

The district is holding four meetings about recommended budget reductions for the 2018-19 school year. District leaders have put forth five recommended reductions for 2018-19 that would cut $13.8 million from the deficit. They’ve also put forth three additional options that would save the district another $13.3 million.

The discussions come as the district embarks on a three-part strategy to review, align and restructure its revenue and expenses. Superintendent Ed Graff has said he hopes to achieve a structurally balanced budget by the 2019-20 school year.

The community-budget meetings are open to anyone. People can review the district’s recommendations online and can also provide feedback.

During the discussions, district staff will present information about the initial budget recommendations and how they may impact schools and families in 2018-19. The district will invite attendees to share their ideas on how it can make changes easier.

Light refreshments, child care and interpretation will be available at the discussions. If accommodations or transportation is needed, please contact 612-668-0128 or shantel.shorter@mpls.k12.mn.us at least 24 hours before the meeting.

Budget discussions will be held in each district attendance zone, but people may attend any discussion regardless of where they live or what school their students attend.

Community Budget Discussions

  • Wednesday, Feb. 7, 6-8 p.m. | Southwest High School , 3414 W. 47th St.
  • Thursday, Feb. 8, 6-8 p.m. | Davis Service Center, 1250 W. Broadway Ave.
    • NOTE: This discussion will be recorded and live-streamed on Facebook.
  • Thursday, Feb. 15, 6-8 p.m. | Wilder Complex, 3345 Chicago Ave.
  • Tuesday, Feb. 20, 6-8 p.m. | Wilder Complex, 3345 Chicago Ave.
  • Arne Boberg

    I would think that you could erase any deficit in a matter of weeks by not doing any cutting of expenses and instead start enforcing traffic laws – running stop signs, parking on bikeways, speeding, illegal lane changes, throwing litter from a vehicle, idling of engines, etc. Another one is enforcing the smoking law in Minneapolis parks. The money is there, but is the city willing to go and get it?

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