BCA completes investigation into police shooting of Jamar Clark

Michaela Day stands with other demonstrators in County Attorney Mike Freeman’s office Feb. 12, holding a sign that says “#No Grand Jury" in the Jamar Clark shooting case.  Credit: Photo by Annabelle Marcovici
Michaela Day stands with other demonstrators in County Attorney Mike Freeman’s office Feb. 12, holding a sign that says “#No Grand Jury" in the Jamar Clark shooting case. Credit: Photo by Annabelle Marcovici

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension announced Wednesday that it has completed its investigation into the fatal police shooting of Jamar Clark in North Minneapolis and handed over its findings to the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman said he would like to decide whether to pursue charges in the case by the end of March.

Prosecutors plan to review the BCA file and determine if additional investigation is needed.

Clark, a 24-year-old black man, was shot during an altercation with police on the 1600 block of Plymouth Avenue North around 12:45 a.m. Nov. 15. Police say he was not handcuffed at the time — a fact disputed by witnesses at the scene.

The FBI is also conducting an investigation into the shooting.

BCA spokeswoman Jill Oliveira said videos gathered during the investigation and other public data will be released once the case is closed. The case remains open during the review process.

The ACLU of Minnesota and the NAACP Minneapolis filed a lawsuit against the BCA and the Minnesota Department of Public Safety Tuesday to compel the release of video footage of Clark’s shooting death. They are arguing that failing to release footage violates the Minnesota Government Data Practices Act.

Black Lives Matter Minneapolis and the NAACP Minneapolis have long been calling for the release of the Jamar Clark tapes.

Protesters demonstrated at Freeman’s office on Friday urging his office to press charges against the officers involved in Jamar Clark’s shooting rather than having a grand jury consider the case.

“We’re here to demand that that does not happen,” said Loretta VanPelt of the Twin Cities Coalition 4 Justice 4 Jamar. “Since 2000 in Minnesota, there have been around 141 people who have been killed by police, and not one time has a grand jury indicted.”

Protesters plan to hold other “Freeman Friday” events in coming weeks to keep attention on the case.

— Annabelle Marcovici contributed to this report